Elizabeth – Depth Challenge – Sewing

This shall be a gallery of items I’ve sewn that live up to the 90% authentic standards that I set out in this post.  I will add photos of each finished item and at least one of the inspiration or documentation.  So in the end there should be 50 galleries on this page.  I will add to it from time to time.  If there is a date listed with an item then it is complete.  Otherwise it is under the needle and I will likely be posting progress on this blog.

This is my primary challenge but I may see what I can do about the others.

So why not do 50 complete outfits rather than 50 individual items?  Simply put I do not have that much closet space.  So items here are single parts of whole outfits and I am including accessories.  I am also counting anything I make for the household (my daughter or my husband) as well as friend and for sale.

Please Note: I am having massive problems with formatting images and text so this might take a while for me to up date this page.

Please click on any image for an enlargement.

Documentation

1) Wool and Silk Sideless Sircote c. 1310.  (August 2010/AS XLV) This sircote is made from 100% blue wool and 100% bright yellow silk dupioni.  The cut of this style of sircote is not as narrow as those of 15th century.  This style was designed for warmth and modesty as much as fashion rather than the later 15th c. examples which leave little to the imagination and are highly sexualized.

2) Child’s Wool Tunic/Gown c. 1310.  (August 2010/ AS XLV) Made for my daughter in 100% wool with silk top-stitching and buttons from Billy & Charlie.  Since the Codex Manesse (the image above) does not show any seam lines I’ve used the Saint Louis Tunic (Site 2) as a starting point.  While this is not an exact copy of the Saint Louis tunic which has inserted gores in the center front and center back, it is similar in construction.  I have added a center back and center front slit to allow for ease of construction and passing my daughters head through the neck hole.  I have also added gores at the side seams because my daughter likes a swirly skirt (gores are found on other extant tunics so they are not uncalled for).  The top-stitching can be found in Crowfoot, Pritchard & Staniland: Textiles and clothing 1150-1450. Medieval finds from excavations of London 4. 2001.  I should also mention that there are no plaquets my gowns of this style.  I simply overlap the center front edges a little and sew on a button.

3) Child’s Tunic Style Gown in Light Blue Silk and Underlined in Linen-Under the needle (post 2 post 3)- this is part one of two gowns both hand sewn.  This is the undergown for a set of 15th century court gowns.  This gown is being sewn with silk thread and a handmade needle (which I really like!).  The seams are being finished by whip stitching it to the linen underlining.  I chose to underline it because the silk did not have a good drape without the weight of the underlining.  We know that both underlining and bag lining were used but I suspect that a court gowns would have been bag lined for a nicer finish because I have never seen (that I can recall) an image of an underlined court or upper class gown.  More on this gown to come and more in the blog.

4) Child’s Wool Over Gown/Tunic with Pearls at the Neckline.  (August 2010/AS XLV) This was made from my daughter in the same 100% wool as number 2 above.  This has a shorter hem & sleeves and a similar method of construction.  I top-stitched all the hems in silk thread for this gown because it is period and I love the look of it for a finishing method. (Crowfoot, Pritchard & Staniland: Textiles and clothing 1150-1450. Medieval finds from excavations of London 4. 2001)

5) Child’s Gown in a cotehardie style with buttons from Billy & Charlie.  (August 2010/AS  XLV) This gown, made for my daughter, is constructed from a linen/rayon blend.  Since children are often dressed in a style similar to, if not a copy of, adult clothing I made this gown modeled on an adult cotehardie but without the supportive nature of the adult garment.  It did not turn out to be as tight fitting as I would have liked.  I top-stitched all the seams with a dark blue silk thread and the buttonholes are machine made in the same thread (it was made just before Pennsic).

6) Child’s Linen Gown/Tunic in Dark Blue c. 1310 (August 2010/AS XLV)This gown is similar in construction to many others listed here (see number 2 for the notes).  This gown was made from left over linen from one of my gowns and its feels wonderful.  I did not have enough for center front and center back gores on this tunic/gown.  It uses the same fo-mother of pearl buttons that number 7 used.  I also did the machine made buttonholes and all the top stitching in teal silk thread.

7) Child’s Gown/Tunic in Light Blue Linen/Rayon c. 1310 (August 2010/AS XLV).  This is a gown similar in construction style to gown number 2 and 6.  It uses fo-mother of pearl buttons at the neck simply because she liked them.  Like all of her gowns it has been surged on the inside and then hand finished.  In this case the button holes are machine done simply because of time issues.

Dieric Bouts, ca. 1455 (Ainsworth, G. David, p. 127)
Dieric Bouts, ca. 1455 (Ainsworth, G. David, p. 127) Detail

8- Ladies Red Linen 15th c. Gown/Kirtle (August 2010/AS XLV).  Only the bodice is lined and it has hand sewn eyelets on one side seam so that it can be worn under a Burgundian Gown.  The panel skirt is pleated at the center front and center back like the images.  There seems to be several versions of the pleating on the skirts in the available art including, pleating for a few inches around center front & back. The documentation is listed with each image here.  In my case it is a short sleeve gown so that I can add pin on sleeves for another look.  I hope to have the Burgundian gown done for 12th Night.  Several of the gowns of this style seem to support the bust in the same way a many of the cotehardies of the 14th century.  I used my cotehardie pattern which uses a supported cotehardie theory and simply added a different skirt.

9) Ladies Blue Linen 15th c. Gown/Kirtlle (August 2010/AS XLV) This gown laces up the side seam so that it can be worn under Burgundain gowns.  It also has short sleeves so that it can be worn with pin on sleeves.  It is made in a similar fashion to number 8 but the skirt has pleats all the way around instead of just center front & back. More to come.

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10) Ladies Yellow Linen 15th c. Gown/Kirtle (August 2010/AS XLV).  This gown laces up the center front with hand sewn eyelets.  It also has short sleeves so that it can be worn with pin on sleeves.  It is made in a similar fashion to number 8 but the skirt has pleats all the way around instead of just center front & back. More to come.

11) Ladies Rose Silk 15th c. Gown/Kirtle (under the needle).  This gown is made from a really lovely silk I had in ivory that I dyed several times to make it rose colored.  The eyelets and finishing work are all by hand.  It is a similar style to previous ones listed here.  More to come.

12) Flemish Working Class Ladies Overgown in Red Wool and Mustard Yellow Linen. (August 2010/AS XLV) This was made as part of my first attempt at Flemish clothing.  I love the color combination.  I used the lacing rings from Billy & Charlie which I love because they don’t pull out.  I need to work on the coverage on the front because it seems to cover too much of the undergown.   More to come.

 

London Hood 55

 

13) Medieval Ladies Hood in Purple Wool and Rust Silk, Powdered with Pewter Leaves (August 2010/AS XLV). The buttons and pewter leaves are from Billy & Charlie.  It has a modest liripipe and top stitching around the outside edge (I did not like the way the fabric was rolling even after a good pressing).  This hood is based on the hoods found in the London digs with inserted gores at the shoulder and buttons at the center front (Crowfoot, Elisabeth; Frances Pritchard and Kay Staniland. Textiles and Clothing, c.1150-c.1450. (Medieval Finds from Excavations in London: 4) London: HMSO, 1992.) Unlike the original model my hood is longer so that it just covers the necklines of my cotehardies by about 2″ rather than just barely meeting.    The powdering comes from mentions found in household account books: QUOTE.  More to come.

14) Medieval Ladies Hood in Forest Green Linen and Blue Linen.  Hand sewn

 

London Hood 55

 

buttonholes and top stitched seams in blue silk thread.  This was one of my favorite tunics which I became too large for so I cut it to made a hood.  It is so soft.  This hood is based on the hoods found in the London digs with inserted gores at the shoulder and buttons at the center front (Crowfoot, Elisabeth; Frances Pritchard and Kay Staniland. Textiles and Clothing, c.1150-c.1450. (Medieval Finds from Excavations in London: 4) London: HMSO, 1992.) Unlike the original model my hood is longer so that it just covers the necklines of my cotehardies by about 2″ rather than just barely meeting.  Under the needle/More to come.

15) Hood for Greg/Gavin in tan wool and rust linen- (October 2010/AS XLV) Wool, linen top-stitched at edge  and button hole stitch at the top of the shoulder gores for reinforcement.  (pictures to come)

16) Hood for Greg/Gavin in blue and yellow linen/rayon blends

17) Hood for Tankrid in yellow and rust linen

 

One Response to Elizabeth – Depth Challenge – Sewing

  1. Pingback: Muirenn’s 50 for 50 | A Fashionable Excuse

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